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Flashing Your Brights

Flashing Your Brights

A One-Day Seminar for Rostered Ministers

 

“Flashing Your Brights” (FLASH) refers to acting on someone’s problems without taking responsibility for their choices.  Drivers often flash their brights as warnings to one another.  They are caring without being codependent. 

Whether dealing with an alcohol/drug problem or supporting people dealing with other issues, the practical tools of the Flashing Your Brights model can help Rostered Ministers provide better care to the people they serve. 

 

Quick Summary

What:  A one-day workshop providing practical tools for Rostered Ministers to use with families troubled by alcohol or other drugs.

When:  June 15, 2017,  8:00 a.m. to 4 p.m. 

Where:  Camp Carol Joy Holling

Cost:  $35 including lunch

Who:  Rev. Otto B. Schultz, ELCA Pastor, M. Div., Licensed Alcohol Drug Counselor who has coached hundreds of families and provided hundreds of workshops in interventions

To Register:  go to http://CJHCenter.org/flashing  

 

Free Samples

To get a sample of the presentations Google or Bing: “Bryan Independence Center Videos.”

 

Here’s What You Will Learn.

·      How to use five simple communication tools that influence behavior change;

·      How those five tools relate to carrying out your holy calling – the proclamation of Law and Gospel, Sin and Grace

·      How to act on an alcohol/drug problem without making a clinical diagnosis 

·      How to get into action before the problem becomes too serious

·      Why rescuing is not an expression of Christian love;

·      How to raise the issue of alcohol and drug use in a pastoral conversation. 

·      How to briefly interview someone to decide if they need referral for further evaluation;

·      How good science and sound theology work together on this issue

·      How well the concepts of sin and disease work together

·      What to expect from a treatment agency

·      How to find resources in your congregation to help with this issue

how responsible caring people can easily support what is destroying that person, all for “very good” reasons.

How alcohol and drug problems hit the whole family - whether it’s the family at home or the Church family. 

·      How your congregation can tackle this issue without taking up a whole ton of your time

·      Why a problem drinker does not have to want help before we take action

·      Why we say all interventions work and why even a “bad” intervention is better than none

 

Course Objectives

Increase participants’

1.  faith that people can change when it comes to alcohol and drug problems.

2.  faith that they can have an influence on the people and families they serve who have problems with alcohol or drugs.

3.  skills in utilizing resources like treatment programs and Twelve Step groups.   

4.  skills in acting on potential alcohol and drug problems. 

5.  faith that sound alcohol/drug interventions are consistent with sound science, sound theology and their holy calling. 

 

Presenter

Otto B. Schultz is a LADC (Licensed Alcohol and Drug Counselor) who holds B. A. and Master of Divinity Degrees.   He has been in the substance abuse field for over 40 years as a chaplain, counselor, educator and program developer.  A member of the Nebraska Synod, he has served Lutheran Churches in Kansas City, MO, Mentor, OH and Norton KS.  He has also led hundreds of workshops on substance abuse issues for pastors, business leaders and other professionals. He can be reached through Facebook Messenger or 402-770-1974 or starfish@inebraska.com.    

Comments from Participants in Similar Workshops:

“Entertaining Presenter.  Very knowledgeable about the subject.”

“Gets his points across with creative examples.  Makes it fun.”

“Engaging, easy to follow, useful information and good pace.” 

“Learned a lot.  Good humor.  Great speaking style and interactions.”

“Realistic way to talk about interventions.  Like how it wasn’t technical.” 

“Appreciated the real-life examples and approaches.  Helped me realize the simplicity of intervening.”